The Ultimate Guide to Measuring Your Online Marketting

The Ultimate Guide to Measuring Your Online Marketting

The Ultimate Guide to Measuring Your Online Marketting
One of the best parts of transitioning your marketing from traditional to digital is the ability to monitor every variable. Here’s how you can get started with three levels of measurement that you can use to monitor your digital marketing.

One of the best parts of transitioning your marketing from traditional to digital is the ability to monitor every variable. Here’s how you can get started with three levels of measurement that you can use to monitor your digital marketing.

 

Level 1: Using Bit.ly (very simple)

Allows you to segment the number of clicks by source and geography.

Bit.ly is the first way to get at least some metrics on the effectiveness of your digital marketing. This method is shockingly simple and requires only that you make a free account, and process URLs through their platform before posting to any platforms. Insight is limited, but if you are looking for a free, expedient solution, bit.ly isn’t half bad.

Level 2: Using Google Analytics with UTM Parameters (sophisticated, but still easy)

Allows you to view variables such time spent on site, most popular pages, user demographics and more – all segmented by the campaign name, source, medium, content, and search terms.

For 99% of businesses that I encounter, this is one level above anything they’ve done before – and it’s shockingly simple to set up. All that this method requires is an installation of Google Analytics (which is essential for any and every business in 2019) and a negligible amount of data entry before sharing any links.

If you’re running digital marketing campaigns with any amount of budget behind them, you’re going to have campaigns that are more successful than others. Without getting to at least this level of data monitoring, you’re never going to know which advertising platforms or campaigns are worth continuing to spend your advertising budget on.

Once you have Google Analytics installed on your website, you’re almost done. Just fill out this form before sharing any links to your website. You don’t need to fill out every field, I recommend just using the “Campaign Source” field to start out – that’s more insight than most businesses ever get.

I also recommend building out a spreadsheet like this one to track your structure so you can keep your data clean, and never get two versions of the same source (e.g. Facebook and facebook.com). There are fixes if you do make that mistake, however.

Level 3: Legitimate Conversion Tracking (somewhat complex)

Measures everything – the number of sales generated per platform, leads collected per advertisement, and total ROI on any digital campaign.

This method changes based on each platform that you could use. Most of my business focuses on online lead generation using Facebook, Google, and LinkedIn Ads, so I’ll show a quick all-in-one solution for these three platforms. I’ll create comprehensive guides for conversion tracking on each of these three platforms at a later date. Just know that these methods can be extended to e-commerce, and can also work on other online platforms. 

Defining a Conversion

First, you need to pick how you want to define a “conversion.” In most lead generation businesses, it’s the collection of contact information from a prospect. It’s important to note that most businesses have more than one type of conversion, and the same prospect may go through multiple conversions before becoming a customer. We use smaller conversion to build towards larger, more valuable ones. However, for this tutorial, we’ll stick to a simple contact form submission on a website.

Next, we need to find a way to identify the conversion as complete. The simplest way of doing this is to show a thank you page after the completion of the form. For an example, fill out my website evaluation form. You’ll notice that you’re redirected to a separate URL for my thank you page. My platforms define a conversion as the moment that a visitor reaches that page. Find the link to your thank you page, you’ll need it for the next steps.

Setting Up Google Analytics

This first platform is important for all businesses, regardless of which platforms they advertise with. Defining your conversions in Google Analytics will, by itself, allow you to track the success of all platforms.

First, navigate to Goals view.

Visit the admin panel by clicking on the gear icon in the bottom left-hand corner (highlighted in yellow below). Select “goals” from the third column (highlighted in blue below). 

 Next, click on the red “new goal” button.
Finally, add your goal.

You will be shown three steps. In step 1, select “custom.”

In step 2, you can name your goal whatever you like, but be sure to set the type as “destination”.

Step 3 is the important part. You’re going to enter the url to your thank you page, starting AFTER your domain name. For example, if my thank you page is at www.yourdomain.com/thank_you, the only thing I’m going to enter is /thank_you.

At the bottom of the page, you’ll notice that there is a “verify this goal” button. This is helpful if you’ve had the thank you page live for a while now, and have received a few conversions. If that’s the case, you can use that button to ensure that you’ve set up the goal correctly.

 Measuring Your Online Advertising

Once you’ve set up a goal or two, you can now effectively check to see how your advertising is working. Continue to tag your URLS with UTM parameters (as shown in level 2) to ensure accurate tracking.

View your conversions by following this path:

  • In your Google Analytics Sidebar, click on “Conversions.”
  • Select “Goals” from the first dropdown.
  • Select “Overview” from the second dropdown.
  • Directly to the right of the second dropdown, you’ll see a heading “Goals.” Select the second option underneath that heading, “Source/Medium”

You should be viewing a dashboard that looks like this.

Using The Lead Generation Data to Determine Return on Investment

This data is extremely valuable to any business that’s using digital marketing to generate leads online. With this dashboard, you’ll be able to see which sources are generating the most amount leads, which you can compare against your budget to determine your cost per lead. Next, you can determine the percentage of leads that your sales team is able to convert into revenue. Divide your cost per lead by your sales conversion rate to get your cost per sale. You may (and probably will) have a different cost per sale on each platform. The goal of digital marketing is to launch campaigns that have a cost per sale lower than the lifetime value of the customer.

Free Website Evaluation

Our Agency

Max Sher Marketing is a web design & development agency in Tucson, Arizona. Max founded this agency four years ago from his college dorm room, and the team has since grown to specialize in building high-converting websites for businesses and individuals.

5 Tips For a Better Website

5 Tips For a Better Website

5 Tips For a Better Website
These are five simple tips, designed to help you get the most out of your next website. If you’re not building a new site, the first two tips are still great things to check for on your existing homepage. Hope this helps!

These are five simple tips, designed to help you get the most out of your next website. If you’re not building a new site, the first two tips are still great things to check for on your existing homepage. Hope this helps!

1. Does My Site Pass the Three Second Test?

Non-Responsive Mobile Site

The three-second test is a measure of messaging and clarity. Our creative director, Andrew, loves this one. The rule is:

“If you can’t tell what a business does within three seconds of viewing their landing page, the messaging is too clouded and needs to be clarified.”

When you’re building your website, particularly if you’re working with a freelancer who doesn’t specialize in marketing, you need to make it absolutely clear that you expect a concise message above the fold on your website. It’s a good idea to keep this rule in mind when browsing through their portfolio as well.

2. Is My Website Responsive? (another easy test)

Next, you’ll want to test your website’s responsiveness. Responsiveness is your website’s ability to adapt (or respond) to different screen sizes, and still display well. There are a lot of ways that this can be done incorrectly, as all font sizes need to change, images need to reorganize, etc., and the content should look good on all screen sizes (within reasonable aspect ratios). Despite this complexity, we’ve found this to be a good rule of thumb:

Open your website on your phone, and try swiping from side to side. Do you have the ability to scroll outside the width of your screen? If so, your website isn’t responsive. See the screenshot below for an example.

Non-Responsive Mobile Site 

Note that this test only works one way: just because your website doesn’t allow you to scroll side to side, doesn’t mean that it is properly set up to be responsive, but if it does allow you to move off screen, then you can be sure that it isn’t responsive.

You should check your designer or developer’s portfolio for this major red flag before paying your security deposit.

3. How Much Control Do You Need?

This is the number one reason that I see projects go over budget and over schedule.

In the industry, we refer to the stuff on your website (text, images, videos, etc.) as content. Some content stays on the site for a long time unchanged (such as the information on the contact page of your website) and some needs to be regularly updated, such as updating listings for realtors, adding or removing healthcare for medical practices, and blog posts.

When building a website, always include your CMS requirements in your RFP.

We call the system that allows you to edit this information without having to do any new development your Content Management System (CMS). There are platforms, such as WordPress and Squarespace, that allow you to make large parts or even all of your website have C capabilities. The technical details aren’t important though, here’s what you need to know:

It is essential that you communicate with your web designer/developer/team what content management abilities you need to have on your site.

Not sure how to articulate this? Book a free call with me before your first web call, and I’ll help you iron what you need to tell your development team.

4. Should You Pay your Developer Hourly? (hint: probably not)

I get it – from a freelancer’s perspective, hourly pay is very attractive. If someone asks for revisions, you get to charge more for the extra time that you spend catering to their needs. Additionally, you don’t have to deal with the struggle of developing a sophisticated pricing model, which we all know can be tedious and stressful.

Don't Pay Developers Hourly

However, from a business owner’s perspective, this model usually doesn’t make sense. You don’t care how much time your developer spends fixing bugs – you just want the final product, and you know exactly how much that’s worth to you. Paying someone a flat fee incentivizes them to get the project done correctly the first time, saving you time and money.

There’s an exception to this: if you’re developing a sophisticated web application, you want your development team to spend lots of time ironing out bugs, improving user experience, and other things. This article is specifically referring to business websites, not SAAS products.

 5. What’s the Goal of My Website?

Why are you building this website? Are you a realtor trying to showcase your listings? Are you a doctor or medical practice trying to book consultations? Keep your primary objective in mind the whole time that you’re monitoring the progress of your website. Here’s a rule of thumb:

If a feature on your website doesn’t contribute to your primary objective, it should be given less prominence than those that do contribute to its completion.

Optimizing Your Website for Conversions

There should be a prominent call to action on your landing screen, or “above the fold,” guiding visitors towards the completion of your primary objective.

This rule of hierarchy applies to all kinds of design – not just web design. Your logo should effectively communicate a primary focus, your fliers should communicate key information prominently, etc.

 Bonus: Building a Website = Building a House

Building a website is very similar to building a house.

If you hire one person to do the whole thing, you’ll end up with something done poorly. Your plumber doesn’t know how to lay concrete, the same way that a developer doesn’t know how to write great sales copy.

That’s why you hire a general contractor to manage your construction projects for you. Your general contractor knows:

– What needs to be done
– What order those things need to be happening in
– Who the best person for each job is
– How to communicate effectively with each of those people to get the desired end product

You wouldn’t try managing a construction project on your own – and it would be unwise to treat a web project any differently.

 Don’t believe me? Answer these five questions:

1. Do you really know which platform your site should be built on?

2. Do you know how to tell if a developer is technically proficient, or would you fall for a good designer who can make garbage look pretty? Is that even relevant to your project?

3. If someone told you that they were good at Search Engine Optimization (SEO), would you know how to tell if they were legit?

4. Do you have someone on your staff who specializes in writing sales copy? How about graphic design? Hope you weren’t planning on leaving those to the same person who’s coding the backend of your site.

Here’s the big one.

5. Are you prepared to start over from scratch if the sole person that you’re counting on to build this site isn’t good enough?

Most businesses should not hire a freelancer to build their whole site, for the same reasons that they shouldn’t hire an electrician to build their whole house. Even if it’s not mine – working with an agency is far less risk than using a freelancer, because it doesn’t require betting on the skillset of one person; there’s a team of people working on every project, ensuring excellence in multiple areas.

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Free Website Evaluation

Our Agency

Max Sher Marketing is a web design & development agency in Tucson, Arizona. Max founded this agency four years ago from his college dorm room, and the team has since grown to specialize in building high-converting websites for businesses and individuals.

Quantity vs. Quality – A Guide to Post Frequency for Businesses on Social Media

Quantity vs. Quality – A Guide to Post Frequency for Businesses on Social Media

Quantity vs. Quality – A Guide to Post Frequency for Businesses on Social Media
High post frequency is often espoused to be the undisputed formula for success online. I’m going to dissect this claim, and then provide a more realistic way to think about business growth on social media.

How often does my business need to be posting on (insert platform)?

When I meet with a business owner or marketing department for the first time, this question comes up without fail. Many of them have heard that they need to be posting every day and that this is the undisputed formula for success online.

Now I’m going to dissect this claim, and then provide a more realistic way to think about business growth on social media. 

 The argument for daily posting.

A few legitimate benefits of high post frequency:

  • More organic (free) impressions overall
  • More opportunities for your audience to engage with you
  • More activity on your profile when someone comes to check you out for the first time
  • More opportunities to provide interesting content

These are real benefits. If you’re receiving 5% organic reach on each post, it makes logical sense that if you want to reach as much of your audience as often as you can (which you do), you should be posting as frequently as possible.

Organic Facebook Reach Over TimeIt’s also true that each post offers an opportunity for your audience to comment and engage with you. I know firsthand that many business owners (particularly those who started as salespeople and realtors) think that engagement is a frivolous metric – but I assure you that when it comes to comments and messages, this is not the case. These comments present you with opportunities to build a relationship – any salesperson can see the value in that.

But do these points lead us to the conclusion that you should always be posting as much as possible on your platforms?

“Post frequency is essential,” my competition argues, “and any social manager who tells you otherwise is just being lazy.”

“No,” I reply, “what’s lazy is convincing your clients that as long as they’re making constant noise on social media, they’ve adequately used a platform to its fullest extent.

Here’s my counterpoint.

Yes – in an ideal scenario, you post every day on each of your important channels to get the most reach and engagement that you possibly can. From a numbers perspective, this point is inarguable.

However, this is only true if you have something worth saying every day on every channel.

And, for a lot of businesses, that is simply not the case. Yes, you do want your logo to be in front of your audience as much as possible, but you don’t want to appear as if you are clueless and not being mindful about the content that you’re posting.

Here’s an illustration of my counterpoint.

Realtors – I love you guys, but I have to pick on you for a second here because you’re notorious for doing this.

Real Estate Social Media Post

Don’t post a link to an article that someone else wrote about upcoming construction in your city.

Instead, drive to those construction sites and record yourself talking about who these neighborhoods might appeal to, and what kinds of buyers you envision moving there.

Or you could write a long-form post about each of the communities. What makes them great? What do your existing clients say about them? What are the drawbacks to living there? Are there/will there be any noteworthy amenities?

Do you see how either of these latter options will establish you as an expert and an authority, while the first makes you seem like you hired a mindless spam-bot to run your account? Perhaps more importantly, which account would you rather follow?

What this means for you.

Now I hear you thinking, “I get it, Max, I see how that’s more valuable, but that’s a lot of work and I don’t have time to do it every day.”

That’s exactly what I’m saying.

If you’re doing social media right, you’re probably going to have to slow down for a second. But that isn’t the end of the world.

Open your Instagram or Facebook feed right now.

Look at the first post on the feed – when was it posted? When was the second one posted? The third? If you go long enough, you’ll notice that they’re out of order. You may have even noticed that some of them don’t even have a date on them.

Instagram Content Agorithm

This is because Facebook (along with the other major social platforms) has a content algorithm that automatically arranges posts in an order that it thinks will “create the best viewing experience for its users,” which is code for “keep them on the platform long enough for advertisers to sell things to them.”

And the posts without dates on them? Those are advertisements and promoted content, they can run for as long as you want, as long as you continue to supply a budget.

If you don’t have time to say something thoughtful, spend less time saying stuff and spend more time thinking about what to say.

A Practical Application.

You have no incentive to post thoughtless content on any platform. If you don’t have time to make a great post, make 25% of a great post. Then, over the next three days, make the remaining 75%.

1. Post that content.
2. Give it a budget and a schedule.
3. Target it towards the people who you want to connect with.
4. Write 25% of the next solid post.
5. Repeat the process.

Eventually, you’ll build a backlog of posts – some of which will be relevant a few months down the line. When that time comes, you can start reusing posts and promoting them to people who haven’t read them yet (or recently).

THAT is how you build a following – not by posting useless articles from random websites and pictures of your product with a shameless call to action.

This is a long-term game, you’re not going to get results from this on your first post, but you’re NEVER going to get results by posting thoughtless content – now matter how long you keep at it.

A general rule of thumb.

Ask yourself this question: Would you follow a page that posts the way you do?

If the answer is a resounding “Yes.” keep doing what you’re doing and expanding to new platforms. Let your audience’s response guide what you post about.

If the answer is no, then you either need to change gear or stop wasting your time on a platform that you’re never going to earn any business from.

If the answer is “Sure! My page is a great way to stay updated on what’s going on with my business,” that means that you’re thinking about this from the perspective of your loyal customers (who you don’t necessarily need to advertise to anymore), and not your first-time consumer.

Put yourself in the shoes of a customer who has never heard of you or your product, and ask again.

 

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Free Website Evaluation

Our Agency

Max Sher Marketing is a web design & development agency in Tucson, Arizona. Max founded this agency four years ago from his college dorm room, and the team has since grown to specialize in building high-converting websites for businesses and individuals.

Retargeting: Ads that Follow You

Retargeting: Ads that Follow You

Retargeting: Ads that Follow You
After visiting a website, you’re bombarded with ads for that website for weeks. Sound familiar? Here’s what you need to know about this tactic.

Quick disclaimer, in this article I’m grouping retargeting and remarketing together. I’m discussing the strategy as a whole, not a specific brand’s implementation.

It’s an all-too-familiar experience.

You’re in the market for a new home, a winter jacket, or a health care policy, so you casually search for the product online and browse around for whatever you’re looking for.

Maybe you’re unsatisfied with the selection that you found, or perhaps you just haven’t decided to purchase yet – but either way, you leave the site without proceeding to checkout.

For the next few days (up to 180 on Facebook and Instagram) you are bombarded with advertisements for the company whose website you were casually browsing.

Sound familiar? Here’s what you need to know about this tactic.

The clear benefits.

This is too effective for any business not to use.

Particularly if you sell high-ticket items, and don’t have any cheaper products or services to use as lower steps on the value ladder (such as a luxury real estate agent), one exposure to your brand is most likely not going to sell the product OR get them to follow your page.

Here are a few examples of successful implementations:

For a luxury real estate client of mine (Houses for $1M+), I’ve found that the cost-per-lead using Facebook lead forms can be cut in half by targeting past website visitors instead of directly targeting the key demographic.

Another real estate client, but this one specializing in student rentals, finds that visitors from organic and paid search demonstrate far more intent to actually rent from them than social media traffic (a common phenomenon). In order to maximize their return on search visitors, we retarget them on social media with lead generation ads, without running any social media traffic ads. This practice helps converts more of our most valuable site traffic.

When running event promotion campaigns, I run an “abandoned registration form” campaign, to specifically target people who visited the registration page but never actually submitted a response.

Another important point: retargeting works with more than just site traffic.

One of my clients, a highly specialized medical doctor, gives lengthy and detailed video lectures on Facebook each week. He receives tens of thousands of views on each video, so we periodically retarget the most engaged video viewers with a call to action.

On some channels, you can also create audiences out of customer lists and CRM databases, which is also an effective strategy if your database is sufficiently large.

Where can you retarget?

There are a few major platforms that allow for retargeting (some use the name remarketing, which is essentially the same thing.) I’ll list the four most important groupings here, with screenshots of what ads on these sites look like in general:

Google Ads/ Youtube Remarketing

Google allows you to remarket to past website visitors/video viewers with display ads and Youtube video ads.

Google Banner Ads

Youtube Advertisement

Facebook/ Instagram Retargeting

Facebook and Instagram allow you to retarget based on a wide variety of engagement criteria, such as website visitors, video views, Facebook Canvas interactions, Instagram Business Profile interactions, and more.

Instagram Retargeting

LinkedIn Retargeting

LinkedIn allows for retargeting of past website visitors based on which pages they visited. You can exclude some URLs, and require others for more advanced targeting options.

 LinkedIn Retargeting Example

Twitter Remarketing

I’ll admit that this is the tool that I use the least of these four – Twitter is probably my least favorite social platform. Twitter has basic retargeting features, largely similar to that of LinkedIn.

Twitter Remarketing Example

How should you start retargeting?

If you only have the budget to pick one retargeting platform, you need to make your selection based on the objective of your advertisement. Here’s how you decide:

  • If you’re trying to encourage people to visit a retail location, use Instagram.
  • If you’re looking for b2c leads, use Facebook or Instagram.
  • If you’re looking for b2b leads, use LinkedIn.
  • If you’re trying to build your following, use Facebook or Twitter.
  • If you’re trying to grow a newsletter list, use Facebook.
  • If you’re trying to increase brand awareness, use Instagram, Facebook, and Google.
  • If you’re trying to encourage online b2c sales, use Facebook or Instagram.
  • If you just want more repeat site traffic, any of these tools will work.

Without a doubt, these are sweeping generalizations – most cases are much more nuanced than this. This guide is a great starting point, and if you’re unsure of what to do, schedule a call with me to discuss the best solution for you.

Setting Up Retargeting

I’m not going to give a detailed explanation of the steps involved in setting this up on each platform – you can find these guides all over the internet specific to what you’re trying to accomplish.

However, it’s good to know at a high-level how these things work. To retarget website visitors, you need to generate a tracking code for the platform you’re using (one or more of the major ad platforms listed above). Once you have that code, you’ll want to insert after the opening <head> tag on each page of your website. There are plugins that make this pretty easy – it’s a similar process to setting up Google Analytics.

Some of these tracking codes allow for more than just retargeting. Conversion tracking is another common feature of this setup, allowing advertisers to track exactly which advertisement lead to which conversions on their site. 

Free Website Evaluation

Our Agency

Sher Agency is a web design & development agency in Tucson, Arizona. Max Sher founded this agency four years ago from his college dorm room, and the team has since grown to specialize in building high-converting websites for businesses and individuals.

How to Cope with Facebook’s New Targeting Restrictions

How to Cope with Facebook’s New Targeting Restrictions

How to Cope with Facebook’s New Targeting Restrictions
If you follow business news at all, you know that Facebook has been having a tough couple of months. Several of my clients have had questions about this, so I thought I’d write something more substantial for those who are curious.

If you follow business news at all, you know that Facebook has been having a tough couple of months. Several of my clients have had questions about this, so I thought I’d write something more substantial for those who are curious.

Shortly after Mark Zuckerberg’s lengthy interrogation by the US Senate, most Facebook advertisers began to see this notification in their “Detailed Targeting” section.

Facebook Targeting Notice

Might be a coincidence, might be something else – who knows. Either way, all partner categories are being removed. Here are some of the things that we’re losing access to.

You Will No Longer Be Able to Target By:

  • Company Size
  • Industry
  • Level of Seniority in Company
  • Charitable Donation Classifications
  • Business Purchases
  • Clothing Purchase Habits
  • Purchase Types
  • Residential Profiles

And, the silver bullet.

  • Financial targeting (Income, Home Value, Net Worth, Liquid Assets, Etc.)

These are just a few of my least favorite upcoming changes, there are a lot more.

So, What Now?

We all knew it was a little bit creepy that Facebook had the ability to target us based off of our credit card purchases and other offline behavior, so I don’t think too many of us were that surprised at this change. With that said, if your strategy really depends on targeting these behaviors/demographics (as many of my clients do), this might be freaking you out.

All hope is not lost. Here are a few strategies that I’m going to be deploying for my clients, that may help you (or your clients) as well.

Solution 1: Reorganize Your Digital Funnel

So, Facebook took away your ability to target Company Size, Level of Seniority, and Industry. Guess what? LinkedIn didn’t.

You can no longer target past buyers of Men’s Accessories on Instagram, but you can certainly still appear in Google Search results for relevant keywords using SEO and Google Ads (formerly known as AdWords).

For some businesses, Facebook will now have to assume a lower position on your digital funnel, being used as a second or third exposure, once they’ve already been pushed to your website through another advertising channel. Just because you can’t directly target these behaviors, doesn’t mean that you can’t promote to them on Facebook. You just have to install a retargeting pixel and create a custom audience of your past website visitors.

Solution 2: Lookalike Audiences

Facebook allows advertisers to upload a list of “customers” to generate a lookalike audience that has similar traits to people who have “already made a purchase from your business.”

This won’t work for all businesses, but it REALLY works for some. This solution is great for you if any of the following apply:

  • You have a database of past customers/clients
  • You have a newsletter/MailChimp list of qualified readers
  • You have some other list of email addresses that belong to your target demographic.

Sounds great, right? Here’s the catch: Lookalike Audiences are a black box.

We have no idea what criteria Facebook is using to match these users to “similar” users. Does it work based off of age? Gender? Education? What about the targeting options that were taken away from us?

We don’t know, and we’ll likely never know. I asked my Facebook rep as much, she pretty much told me that it’s proprietary information, and we don’t know if the coming changes are going to affect the lookalike audience algorithm.

The only way to reliably test this solution will be on a case-by-case basis. You have to run a split test with a higher-level goal (conversions, leads, sales) and measure the difference in results between a few audiences. Don’t go too cheap on the split test, or you’ll end up making a wrong decision that will cost you far more in the long/medium-term. Make sure you’re getting a few goal completions and a hefty amount of impressions. I would test 3-4 audiences: your page followers, your website visitors, the lookalike, and some other audience as a control.

Solution 3: Buying Data from a 3rd Party Provider

If you don’t have the necessary customer list to implement Solution 2, just buy one! There are many companies that sell these lists, and they can be VERY targeted. Customer lists can get very pricey, so it’s important that you’re strategic with the ones that you purchase in both the number of records that you license, the licensing terms (some work on a CPM impressions basis, some on a per record basis, and other terms), and the way that you use these lists.

Solution 4: Target Indirectly

Targeting individuals directly by income isn’t an option anymore – but between zip codes, job titles, and education levels, you might be able to get pretty close.

You won’t be able to target people who have donated to animal welfare charities, but you CAN target vegans and vegetarians.

You can’t target leisure travelers anymore, but those who have recently visited Las Vegas or Orlando are still on the table.

You can’t target people who have spent money on home improvement, but you can target people who watch HGTV and live in upper-middle-class zip codes.

These are just a few simple examples, which will really need to be refined and experimented with, but you get the point.

Looking Forward

No matter how many solutions I give you, this change sucks – for now. My prediction is that within the next year Facebook restores our behavior targeting or offers something equally as powerful in exchange (maybe using data from the other apps it owns?) But maybe that’s just wishful thinking.

Hope you found this helpful!

– Max 

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Free Website Evaluation

Our Agency

Max Sher Marketing is a web design & development agency in Tucson, Arizona. Max founded this agency four years ago from his college dorm room, and the team has since grown to specialize in building high-converting websites for businesses and individuals.